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North Carolina Era 11: Recent (1975-2010) Lesson Plans

“After the Ball” Ballad Lesson

LESSON: “After the Ball” Ballad
UNIT: North Carolina Era 11: Recent (1975-2010)


LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  •  Students will understand how folktales and ballads can change over time between groups of people and distances, even in the same community.
  • Students will recognize artistic characteristics of southern Appalachia.
  • Students will work cooperatively.
  • Students will engage in critical thinking.
  • LEARNING TARGET: “I can analyze artistic writing to understand how language changes across time and distances.”

TEACHER PLANNING:

  • Time Needed: 15 Minutes
  • Materials/Equipment:Copies of the “After the Ball” Ballads (two or three different versions)

PROCEDURE:

  1. Ask students “what are ballads?,” “how can songs reflect a culture?”
  2. Divide students into groups (no more than four).
  3. Students will work together in groups to examine different versions of the same ballad and are to discuss the differences in each.
  4. Students should consider why the ballads may be written differently, how language can change across distance and time, and what these ballads say about
    southern Appalachian culture.
  5. Class should reconvene together to discuss their hypotheses and share what they think of the ballad itself.
  6. Review the purpose and history of balladry in North Carolina and its significance to state culture and language.

ASSESSMENT:

  • Informal assessment based upon group and class discussion.

NORTH CAROLINA CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT:

  • 8.H.3, 8.C.1

LESSON MATERIALS:

  • All materials needed for this lesson can be found here.

“The Farmers Two Sons” Ballad Lesson

LESSON: “The Farmers Two Sons” Ballad
UNIT: North Carolina Era 11: Recent (1975-2010)


LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Students will understand how folktales and ballads can change over time between groups of people and distances, even in the same community.
  • Students will recognize artistic characteristics of southern Appalachia.
  • Students will work cooperatively.
  • Students will engage in critical thinking.
  • LEARNING TARGET: “I can analyze artistic writing to understand how language changes across time and distances.”

TEACHER PLANNING:

  • Time Needed: 15 Minutes
  • Materials/Equipment: Copies of the “The Farmers Two Sons” Ballads (two or three different versions)

PROCEDURE:

  1. Ask students “what are ballads?,” “how can songs reflect a culture?”.
  2. Divide students into groups (no more than four).
  3. Students will work together in groups to examine different versions of the same ballad and are to discuss the differences in each.
  4. Students should consider why the ballads may be written differently, how language can change across distance and time, and what these ballads say about
    southern Appalachian culture.
  5. Class should reconvene together to discuss their hypotheses and share what they think of the ballad itself.
  6. Review the purpose and history of balladry in North Carolina and its significance to state culture and language.


ASSESSMENT:

  • Informal assessment based upon group and class discussion.

NORTH CAROLINA CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT:

  •  8.H.3, 8.C.1

LESSON MATERIALS:

  • Materials needed for this lesson can be found here.

Why Go To a Festival?

LESSON: The lure of folk and regional festivals
UNIT: Era 11 – Recent North Carolina – 1975 - present

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Learners will analyze posters and brochures for folk and regional festivals
  • Learners will make inferences about the appeal of these events
  • Learners will compare and contrast different festivals in the late 20th century
  • LEARNING TARGET: I can give three reasons people want to attend folk and regional festivals.

TEACHER PLANNING:

  • Time needed: 20 minutes
  • Materials/Equipment: group packets of posters/advertising materials from the Byard Ray Folk Festivals, Lunsford Mountain Music and Dance Festivals, and the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival.

PROCEDURE:

  1. Put students into cooperative groups. Have them examine the packets of the posters/advertising/newspaper articles.
  2. Ask the students to list what draws people to attend these events.
  3. Each group should then construct a three ring Venn diagram comparing and contrasting the three different festivals.
  4. As a group, do they believe these types of events can sustain themselves? Why or why not? What makes them successful?

ASSESSMENT:

  • Each group should turn in a list, a Venn diagram, and an analysis of the festival events.

ADDITIONAL/EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

  • You could ask the students which of these festivals they would attend and why they would attend that one. Many might say that they would go to the Lunsford Festival since it is in Mars Hill.

LESSON MATERIALS:

Materials needed for this lesson can be found here: